This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
In the Garden


them from the nylon mesh bag which could trap or injure birds.


Ponds Keep ponds and pools clean from fallen leaves. Net ponds to catch fallen leaves and remove them on a regular basis. Fish may die when the air is cut off by a frozen surface so to prevent the pond from freezing over completely, use floats or invest in a pond heater. Keep a general check out for leaks as frost can cause defects in certain lining materials.


Lawns Carry on mowing the lawn in mild weather, keeping the blade high at 2-4cm. Remove fallen leaves from the lawn by raking up or leaf blowing the fallen leaves to prevent disease and slugs and snails from overwintering in cosy little spots ready to eat new spring shoots. If there is prolonged rain and you notice water logging, use a fork and spike the ground to improve drainage. Try and avoid walking on the lawn in frosty weather.


Garden lighting The ultimate way to bring warmth and life into a garden making it inviting, stunning and practical. Daniel Matthews of United Electrical Contractors Limited explains. When taking garden lighting into consideration it is important to have the right balance of amenity lighting complimented with decorative lighting to make the pinnacle


points of the garden stand out. There are many ways of bringing life into the garden with lighting. Traditional methods such as halogen lighting use spike lights to direct light onto shrubs and highlight trees and contemporary features. LED lighting is becoming more popular as the costs are becoming more realistic and colour changing LED lighting gives you complete control on the look of the garden at the touch of a button. This can make the garden feel like a whole new world for whatever mood you are in.


Wall lighting, pillar or post lighting will give you the amenity lighting required for outdoor dining and practicality for children wishing to play out late. Powerful up lighting is also a strong factor these days, if you have a bold wall within the garden you can light it to take advantage of the reflections created in the garden. Even highlighting the house gives a great effect.


Quality fittings are paramount. There are many fittings on the market to suit everyone’s budget but be sure that they are of a good quality to prevent having to change them a year down the line. Make sure the items are installed to a high standard so they ensure safety and functionality. Whichever option is taken it is important to have a plan. Making sure your designer can work with other trades is critical and communication is key.


10 plants for winter colour & interest


Hamamelis x intermedia 'Livia' (lively red witch hazel)


Cornus Sanguinea 'Midwinter Fire' (Dogwood)


Betula albosinensis var. septentrionalis (Chinese red birch)


Lonicera x purpusii (Honeysuckle)


Prunus davidiana 'Alba' (Chinese wild peach)


Corylus avellana (Corkscrew hazel) Garden lighting, United Electrical Contractors Ltd


Helleborus x ericsmithii 'Winter Moonbeam' (Winter rose) Sarcococca confusa (Christmas box) Mahonia x media (Lily of the valley bush) Chimonanthus praecox (Wintersweet)


55 20:20


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102