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m“ Until last year I would have been the same; I’d have popped


y money into the collection pot, bought the raffle ticket, read the brochure and listened politely to the speech





to fall upon the mercy of the State. The sad reality is that even the States of Jersey does not automatically provide for every eventuality.


Of course, insurance contracts can and do fill many of the financial gaps which death or serious long term illness can create and we should each look long and hard at the provision we have for ourselves and our family. If you or your loved one needs long term care the money will run out soon enough.


Specialist care, quite rightly, does not come cheap and does not leave room for many extras. When tragedy strikes, and real life slowly returns, you have to take a deep breath, re-group and find a way to pay the bills. Unfortunately you soon realise that there is nothing extra for you to live life with. Every penny you have is committed to essential basic needs.


Fund raising for the Cheshire Home allows the residents to experience more of the normal things in life. The things that they simply do not have funds for, but that you and I might take for granted, such as going to a concert, a meal out or a holiday. They even have specially adapted vehicles which are available for residents to use so they are able to get out and about on their own.


But it’s not all about the money!


The press has given a lot of coverage to the concept of the ‘Big Society’ in recent months, almost as if it’s a new idea. Odd really since it seems to me that the ‘Big Society’ has been around for a great deal longer than most of the politicians who are now advocating it.


Throughout our own personal tragedy, Shaun and I have been shown overwhelming support from so many places, with echoes of our former lives playing out through the friendship shown; the Les Ormes Golf club members who took away the practical hassle of laying a slope to the back door of our home so I could get Shaun home from time to time; the wonderful Le Rocquier Big Band who shoulder the responsibility for visiting on Wednesdays each week so that I get at least one day off; my colleagues at AdvisaHepburnOracle picking up much of the slack in my absences from the office and the little day to day needs which were simply dealt with by our friends at St. Aubin Methodist Church. Then there are the cards, jokes and cups of tea supplied on countless occasions by so many others.


I’m a bit of a cynic so the concept of a corporation having a conscience has always been difficult for me. However, there


are many benefits to be found by putting Corporate Responsibility into action. For staff taking part in group projects there is a true sense of achievement, something unlikely to be achieved by a night out on the town. The Cheshire Home has recently undergone a face lift, much of the hard graft being carried out by employees of Hawksford International who have also volunteered to help put up the Christmas decorations. A simple low cost project, but it provides a high value to staff and employer as well as the residents.


Companies build their reputations over many years, but huge damage can be caused at the blink of an eye through corruption, scandals or environmental accidents. So building a culture of ‘doing the right thing’


is a way of


attracting like minded employees and customers. Having a brand that stands out, for the right reasons, is immensely valuable, building loyalty and trust from consumers in an increasingly harsh market place.


In 2012 and the years to come, States funding is inevitably going to be under pressure and more reliance will fall upon the voluntary sector. For Corporations facing similar restrictions to their budgets for marketing and with staff benefits under pressure, social projects could be the ideal solution.


CSR - Helping others Page 9


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