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“ Do your homework. Clever investors don’t invest money in a company’s shares without thorough


research. The same applies to art and antiques ”


incredible value for money. At lower levels, some traditionally sought ceramics, such as copper lustre jugs or Victorian Staffordshire figures now have virtually no price. Contrast this with stellar performances for hugely sought items by Martin Brothers and Moorcroft. The 20th century and contemporary art markets have never been stronger as wealthy entrepreneurs and even traditional collectors enter the market to furnish and decorate in the current minimalist fashion.


"Good quality decorative objects such as this life size 19th century Italian marble carving of Venus, after Canova, will always be desirable and unlikely to fall in value. Value 15 years ago, about £10,000, today, around £15,000."


example a worn common coin will be worth a tiny fraction of a mint example but condition will make little difference to a coin that is unique. There will be many more buyers for perfect or rare examples and they will be much easier to sell in the future.


3. Buy from a reputable dealer, gallery or auction. When buying for investment and especially when spending significant sums of money, always obtain a detailed receipt and always keep safe and secure any accompanying provenance. Any problems in the future concerning authenticity or accuracy of description will be much easier to resolve.


4. Keep track of how your investments are performing. It is important to be well informed about trends and fashions. Changing fashion can have a dramatic effect on the value of art and antiques. Victorian oil paintings and watercolours have crashed in price over the last five to ten years. Traditional ‘brown’ furniture has never been cheaper and represents


5.Try and spot the next trend before others and get into the market early. Things to look out for include anniversaries of great or tragic historic events. Next year sees the centenary of the sinking of the Titanic in 1912. There will be huge international interest and subsequently souvenirs and relics from the vessel will almost certainly achieve record prices at auction. The clever investor will have been buying these items for the last few years with the aim of realising his investment at the peak of the market. The not so smart investor will be the buyer of these items! Buying the work of an artist before they are ‘discovered’ is a good way of making significant returns but remember, most artists remain undiscovered for their entire working life!


6. Only buy typical examples of an artist’s work. Don’t buy solely on price. A work will be cheap for a reason- nobody wants it and it will be much more difficult to resell in the future.


7. Economic success drives the popularity of a market. The Japanese economy has been in the doldrums for several years and consequently the prices of Japanese works of art have


"Chinese porcelain hu shape vase with flambe glaze, Guangxu period, late 19th century. Chinese antiques and art have risen dramatically in price over the last five years driven by newly wealthy Chinese buyers. This vase is worth ten times what it was worth five years ago."


fallen steadily during this period. Contrast this with China, a booming economy and similarly booming prices for Chinese art and antiques, the newly wealthy Chinese middle classes clamouring to buy back their own wares. Look for where the money will be in the future, perhaps good Indian art and antiques will be the next big performer.


8. Do your homework. Clever investors don’t invest money in a company’s shares without thorough research. The same applies to art and antiques.


Investing in art, antiques and collectables is fun and exciting and allows the serious investor and enthusiastic amateur alike to own items that are both beautiful and functional with, given the right choice, the chance of a decent profit if you grow tired of it! The one rule to remember above all others is “BUY WHAT YOU LIKE”!


Stephen Cohu Antiques. La Grande Route De St Laurent, Jersey, JE3 1NJ


Tel: 01534 485177 Mob: 07797 723895 Fax: 01534 485177 Website: www.stephencohuantiques.com


Money & Investment


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