This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
States of Jersey Police Crime Reduction Officer, Jeremy House, is on hand to offer advice and guidance on Crime Prevention and keeping you and your property safe


A guide to home security


Make it difficult for the burglar Look at your home through a burglar’s eyes. • How would you get in if you’d forgotten your keys?


• If you can get in, so can a burglar. • Are there places where they could break in without being seen?


• Would they have to make a lot of noise by breaking glass?


Windows If you are replacing windows, take the opportunity to install new ones that are certified to British Standard BS7950 ‘Windows of Enhanced Security’ and consider using laminated glass or anti shatter film, particularly in ground-floor and accessible windows, as this is much harder to break.


Fit window locks with keys to all downstairs windows and windows that are easy to reach – for example, those above a flat roof or near a drainpipe.


Even small windows such as skylights or bathroom fanlights need locks. A thief can get through any gap that is larger than a human head.


Louvre windows are especially vulnerable because thieves can easily take the slats out of the frame. Glue the slats into place, and fit a special louvre lock. Better still, replace them with fixed glass. Consider fitting security grilles to vulnerable windows – but only if these windows are not escape routes in case of fire. Many DIY shops now sell decorative wrought-iron grilles.


Page 70 Home & Hearth


Doors ➊Door viewer If you don’t have a window in the door, or some other way of checking who is calling, fit a door viewer.


➋Hinges Check that the door hinges are sturdy and secured with strong, long screws. For added security, fit hinge bolts.


➌Letterboxes Never hang a spare key inside the letterbox. Letterboxes should be at least 400mm (16 inches) from any locks. Consider fitting a letterbox cage or other restrictor, which prevents thieves from putting their hands through the letterbox.


➍Rim latch Most front doors are fitted with a rim latch, which locks automatically when the door is closed. You can open these from the inside without a key. For strength and quality, look for BS3621 Kite marked products. For extra protection, you should consider installing the following.


➎Automatic deadlock This locks automatically when the door is closed and is more secure than other types of rim latch.


➏Chains and door viewers Buy a door bar or chain and door viewer. Use them every time someone calls. Remember, though, that you only use the door chain or bar when answering the door – don’t leave it on all the time.


➐Mortise deadlock Fit a five-lever mortise deadlock about a third of the way up the door. Most insurance companies are happy with one Kite marked to British Standard BS3621.


Sliding patio doors should have anti- lift devices and locks fitted to the top and bottom to stop them being removed from outside, unless they already have a multi-locking system. Get specialist advice.


Keys Never leave a spare key in a convenient hiding place such as under the doormat, in a flowerpot or behind a loose brick. If you move into a new home, change the front and back door locks immediately.


Decide on a safe place for your keys away from doors and windows and always use it, so you can find them in an emergency.


If you live in a flat Doors to flats over a floor level of 4.5 metres (normally those on the second floor or higher) should have locking mechanisms fitted in line with BS5588. Consider having a phone-entry system fitted to the main door to your building. Never ‘buzz’ open the door for strangers or hold the door open for someone.


Remember • Lock – keep your doors and windows locked, even when you’re at home.


• Stop – are you expecting anyone,


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108