This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
reviews JeniFeR evans
Jenifer evans:
solo show 1
RitteR/Za m et, London
10 Janua Ry – 2 FebRuaRy
For recent Royal College of Art graduate Jenifer Evans, 2007 was the ‘last minute’ year. She knocked up a Last
Minute Project for the Zoo Art Fair for her solo presentation with Ritter/Zamet. She stuck a yellow-smeared
plaster cast of her face on top of a swaddled trunk in Last Minute Piece to Use Up Everything in My Studio and
perched a similar head on top of a Plexiglas box full of little pieces of scrap in Last Minute Piece for Jerry Saltz.
In 2008, however, she’s changed tactics, and her first solo exhibition, originally titled Last Minute Project for
January 2008, was eventually named, plainly, Solo Show 1.
Acutely aware of the expectations raised by a first solo show – a decisive moment in any young artist’s
career – Evans has put up one of the most self-conscious examples of the genre, setting out to map her whole
trajectory from juvenilia to present day (think Tracey Emin’s 1994 My Major Retrospective 1963–1993 or Peter
Friedl’s 2006 MACBA retrospective, Work 1964–2006). At Ritter/Zamet an entire wall is panelled up with
multiple oils on canvas, the remnants of Evans’s artistic apprenticeship, directly drilled into the gallery concrete.
Each painting marks an experiment, the temptation of a style quickly abandoned. Each is also defaced, the
better to negate these childish exercises.
In due course, Evans moved on from the well-behaved oil painting to installations. Solo Show 1 was realised
on-site over a week with fragments from previous artworks and various bits of trash she found in her studio
Solo Show I, 2008 (installation view).
and in and around Ritter/Zamet’s space. If Last Minute Project didn’t make it as a title, there is in this installation Courtesy Ritter/Zamet, London
the same sense of emergency-as-strategy, the same Isa
Genzken-esque compulsive recycling of the everyday. In the
larger part of the gallery, Evans shows eight figures, hanging,
sitting, on a plinth or on a stick. A canvas folded in two, its
frame snapped and bent, looks like a grotesque storybook;
Evans beats up painting until it shows its guts. She also plays
out one of the all-time art-history fantasies, the canvas looking
back at the viewer, with a camera stuck on an easel, the fixity
of its lens-gaze emphasised by a plaster cast of the artist’s face
suspended above.
Self-portraiture, another acme of art history, is also
irreverently embraced. Not only does Evans impose her
presence with a crowd of plaster casts of her head but she
also scatters the show with numerous self-images, photos,
paintings and drawings, in which she is often seen holding a
brush, Rembrandt-style. On one drawing she adds a mobile
phone and an acceptance-speech bubble: ‘Yeah, I think,
I would like to thank my mother…’. Certainly Evans’s narcissist
self-affirmation as a successful artist could reveal a post-
graduation insecurity, and it’s clear that she wants to convince
us that this is a triumphal entry into the artworld – but thanks to
the ingenuity of her energetic production, it works.
Coline Milliard
artreview 154
march_REVIEWS.indd 154 5/2/08 13:48:31
Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com