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This is another version of the L&M ilk of show past; Andre because sculpture could only reach
in that it’s cleanly curated, gorgeously its own zero degree once all ‘composition’
installed and intended to recontextualise one became a given material’s own (a far more
artist, Fausto Melotti, to appeal to collectors radical gesture than simply exchanging the
who buy another. According to the press release, idea of ‘sculpture’ for ‘specific objects’, I
the two share an engineer’s precision and a think).
sense of whimsy. I am mad for Melotti’s
ceramics; but Mathes is showing his metal And we’d do well to keep this in mind when
sculpture, and charming though it is, Melotti’s approaching (15) WAde GuyTon’s newest monochrome
no Calder. inkjet paintings at Friedrich Petzel Gallery.
As ‘process’ works, which is how they are
regularly positioned by Guyton’s supporters,
the paintings are uninteresting. But as
‘inkjet’ paintings, as works which attempt to
intervene in this new technology, in this new
‘matter’, and use it in a heterodox manner
(think Burri and his precious Celotex), the
work is very successful, if underdeveloped.
(16) dAnA MeLAMed achieves something similar
with her new series of heavily worked drawings
at Priska Juska, which incorporate the leftover
trailings of Letraset stencils or transparency
film and printing waste to create urban scenes
that echo Piranesi’s Carceri (1745). Melamed’s
gesture is not quite as clean or conceptually
driven as Guyton’s, but the experimentation is
genuine and the thought fully developed.
does it all have to be so serious? Perhaps not.
(17) JIM SHAW has certainly demonstrated that
a little entertainment can be injected into
the otherwise staid galleries of high culture.
Shaw did this to great effect with his The
Donner Party (2003), recently on view at P.
S.1, and at Metro Pictures he does it again
with his most recent contribution, Dr Goldfoot
and His Bikini Bombs (more exhibitions need to
rip off their titles from campy 1960s Vincent
Price movies). Shaw is the Hollywood studio
version of Tim Hawkinson’s indie-arthouse
quirkiness: less philosophy but higher
budgets.
He also appears to have incredibly clear
dreams. Much of what Shaw offers the audience
are various ‘dream objects’ that reconfigure
bits and pieces of the body into pop-surrealist
bits of sculpture. For example, Shaw’s Dream
Calder’s work has a formal and aesthetic Object (Butt-Head Bucket) (2007) rethinks half
rigour. His mobiles occupy and enliven space. the human head as a clear and open container
The play between the angular red base, the with a shallow filling of pink foam, the
spiralling brass counterweight and the moving ‘overhead’ view of which looks like a cartoon
elements of his Yellow Triangle (1965) create ass. Nose Sculpture Wall Sconce (2007) looks
an aesthetic synergy that gives the work energy exactly like it sounds, while Dream Object (At
and presence. a LACE meeting with Liz Taylor in some warehouse
I realized I could make (as Dream Objects)
Melotti is static. Contrappunto Libero (1972), stuff I’d not dreamt of like the giant ear
in which discs, crescents and rings cut from lounge chair) (2007) looks at once just like
sheet copper are affixed to a tower-like frame, – and then a little less like – what its title
lacks visual and material tension. The result describes. (And really, who wouldn’t want a
is almost twee. His Untitled (1978), in which giant ear lounge chair?)
he painted and scratched a plaster block in an
evocation of the misty Venice Lagoon dotted you could ask the same thing of (18) CHrISTIAn
with gondolas is, however, gorgeous. Melotti KozuL’s big black feathered, sequinned and
is worth knowing about, just not compared studded mechanical bull at Goff + rosenthal,
to Calder. though this is less a dream object than
Reviews Marathon.indd 82 7/1/08 16:51:28
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