This book includes a plain text version that is designed for high accessibility. To use this version please follow this link.
MODERN TIMES

Italian Design on Display

Surprising as it may sound, Italy has never had a museum dedicated to Italian design. That changed recently with the opening of Milan’s Triennale Design Museum last December. Designed by Michele de Lucchi and Italo Rota, it is housed in renovated portions of the 1933 Palazzo dell’Arte, which it shares with the Triennale di Milano art museum. The design museum is on the second floor, while downstairs is a design library, archives and documentation center. The museum’s inaugural installation, “Obsessions of Italian Design” (through April 2009), is a collaboration between Rota and filmmaker Peter Greenaway. It places 100 20th-century Italian design objects by Ettore Sottsass, Vico Magistretti, Gaetano Pesce and others within the context of Italian culture and history by displaying them with projected films by Greenaway and six contemporary Italian film directors. “This museum aims to show that the history of design is in many ways independent of, and an alternative to, that of art and architecture,” says architect Andrea Branzi, the museum’s scientific director. “Because of its unique nature…related to everyday life, it provides precious cultural and anthropological information for understanding the history of our country.” For more information visit www.triennale.it.
-Stephanie Bakal

Real Modern: Pull up a Chair
We often get inquiries from readers seeking modernist furniture and accessories that fit today’s spaces, lifestyles and budgets -- especially smaller apartments and condominiums.

In the early 1950s, Danish designer Hans Olsen (1919-92) anticipated the shrinkage of living spaces, creating one of his most sought-after designs: a round teak dining table and chairs that took up no more space than the table top itself. The table’s apron had cut-outs sized to admit the top rail of each chair’s back; the three-legged chairs’ seats were triangular, fitting beneath the table like wedges of a pie. Now discontinued by its manufacturer, Frem Røjle, the design has become highly sought-after, commanding anywhere from $1,500 to several times that amount, depending on condition.

For the budget-minded, two alternatives exist. Sears, Roebuck made a line-for-line copy that was featured in the 1967 Spring and Summer catalogues; it can be instantly distinguished from the original by its wood-grained Formica table top and elm wood framing. Examples don’t turn up often enough to determine pricing, but this version should cost far less than Olsen’s original. The most accessible variation is at IKEA. Designer Sandra Kragnert has riffed on Olsen’s idea by putting chairs with shaped backs at each gently curved corner of a rectangular table to create the Fusion dining set in ash veneer and chrome, with an Arne Jacobsen feeling ($299, www.ikea.com).
-Sandy McLendon
Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com. Publish online for free with YUDU Freedom - www.yudufreedom.com.